Tag Archive:   painting


The Road to Los Angeles Upon entering Alberto Mielgo’s debut solo exhibition “Solo” the viewer is met with a map.  A simple diagram that outlines the gallery space with numbers presented in a disjointed sequence scattered throughout opposite ends of the expansive GR Works.  Inscribed on the map is a brief message written by Mielgo, [...]

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Robin Leach coined the catchphrase that toasted viewers to “Champagne Wishes and Caviar Dreams” at the conclusion of each episode of “Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous,” a syndicated T.V. program that chronicled the opulence and glory of celebrities. Painter Sean Cheetham borrows the tagline for his current solo exhibition with a series of portrait [...]

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In Chris Barnard’s Crowd Pleaser, New Mexico, a splintering shard of remaining daylight eclipses an empty box of metal bleachers facing a desolate desert landscape. Darkened clouds are set to converge, promising imminent darkness and threatening rain, but the spectacle has already taken place and the crowd has dispersed. The ambiguous New Mexican environ depicted [...]

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The female “type”  in art evolves to satisfy taste and reflect social ideals.  There’s the Odalisque, the Venus, the nude, the naked as seen through the lens of the voyeur to name a few and then there’s the portrait full or half length, action painting, or studies.  The artist has lamented over the female form [...]

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Frederick Wight (1902-1986) first established himself as a fixture in the California art scene not as a painter, but during his two-decade tenure as a museum curator and director of the UCLA Art Gallery.  Located on the North Campus before the development of the UCLA Hammer Museum, Wight championed the careers of artists who had [...]

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In her fourth solo show A Stack of Black Pants at Cherry and Martin, one cannot help but sense Amanda Ross-Ho’s oeuvre as improvisational, where the works in the gallery space are subject to revision and revision.  Pencil markings discreetly written at random on the walls at odd heights and angles invite the attentive viewer [...]

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The “Power Plays” paintings of Kellisimone Waits make a politically ironic statement rather than a satiric one. By depicting figures of power like former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, John McCain, Nancy Pelosi, and Hillary Clinton in rather compromising positions, Waits strips them of their political and moral authority and imagines them as flawed and [...]

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The fantastical spectral illumination of color fields captured by Ned Evans in his current show Inside the Prism recalls a childlike curiosity to make sense of the world through a kaleidoscopic lens.  Evans’ conscious use of his materials of acrylic paint and mixed media on canvas explore the relationship between colors beyond the rudimentary grouping [...]

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