Tag Archive:   faheyklein


Time is an unknown variable in the photographs of Jonathan Anderson and Edwin Low. Granted unprecedented access for two years inside the training facilities of China’s elite gymnasts, the duo document the rigorous discipline of training that pushes the limits of the human form and challenges the psyche. Documenting the daily pressures of gymnasts in [...]

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The photographic practices of Mark Laita and Rodney Smith demonstrate an acute attention to form, composition, and revel in the act of looking. Whether it’s marveling at the juxtaposition of geometric contortions and scale patterns of exotic serpents or capturing an alluring woman who never acknowledges the camera, the photographs uncover animal and human subjects [...]

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“Coincidences” celebrates the first Los Angeles solo exhibition of French photographer Sarah Moon, featuring a selection of over seventy black and white and color photographs culled from her commercial career and personal collection.  The selection here not only represents a 35-year career marked by a rich and textured photographic style, but points to the diversity [...]

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Larry Fink’s collection of silver gelatin and archival pigment print photographs titled “The Vanities” investigates the private moments of public personas of the film and fashion world. They project nether worldly beauty, decadence, and by implication lead a life that walks the tightrope of fantasy on earth.  In Fink’s lucid photographs, women don elegant silk [...]

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Nick Brandt’s series “A Shadow Falls” at Fahey/Klein is a continuation of the artist’s ongoing effort to capture wildlife in East Africa and raise awareness that the most exotic animals on Earth are threatened by extinction.  Although the large- scale archival prints capture the massive scale of elephants, giraffes, lions, and herds of zebras the [...]

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The photographic reportage of Jean-Marie Périer at Fahey/Klein documents movie stars and rock stars and provides us with the ultimate First Person Access. Périer’s color portraits of the Beatles filed behind a red door of a London flat, a lonely Keith Richards strumming an acoustic guitar in empty theatre with gaudy yellow cushions, and Bob [...]

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