Archive for January 1st, 2010


For William Powhida “I” is an Other.  This diabolical “otherness” is not a wholly separate entity of ourselves rather (re) presented in our own image to say what we cannot. The underlying tension created in “No One Here Gets Out Alive” is the battle between artist and art critic William Powhida and his quick-witted, twisted- [...]

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The “Power Plays” paintings of Kellisimone Waits make a politically ironic statement rather than a satiric one. By depicting figures of power like former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, John McCain, Nancy Pelosi, and Hillary Clinton in rather compromising positions, Waits strips them of their political and moral authority and imagines them as flawed and [...]

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In his show “The Great” Matthew Heller combines prose written a wavering line of the lines.  He writes “I have always loved walking with you those cloudy mornings, the sadness on a cloudy day dissolved with a walk…” the undulating rhythm of his poetic voice and the inherent flaw of his vernacular which has no [...]

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The complex and astutely scientific studies of light in Marcia Roberts’ solo show at Rosamund Felsen Gallery are simply mesmerizing.  Roberts captures sheets of light floating on the pictorial plane, suspended in time and space as they lean and fold in on each other.  Presenting the same subject in each canvas, Roberts’ roots in the [...]

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The fantastical spectral illumination of color fields captured by Ned Evans in his current show Inside the Prism recalls a childlike curiosity to make sense of the world through a kaleidoscopic lens.  Evans’ conscious use of his materials of acrylic paint and mixed media on canvas explore the relationship between colors beyond the rudimentary grouping [...]

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Daniel Dove’s large-scale oil paintings attempt to reconcile the duality of the world outside of the artist’s studio that is in disarray, with the world inside of the canvas that can make sense of the damage already done.  Dove reconstructs structures in transitory states, most often on the brink of complete collapse and reconstructs them [...]

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The subject found in the photographic works of both Richard Gilles and Bernadette DiPietro is the object- the object as the billboard that frequently crosses the path of the motorist, and the clothesline, which is rarely seen in metropolitan cities.  Aside from this shared fascination, Gilles and DiPietro present two diametric worldviews. DiPietro sees cultures [...]

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