Video installation Mommy is Uri Nir’s first solo exhibition in the United States and re-acquaints viewers with one of the earliest conventions of cinema, the match-cut.  Nir’s cinematic concerns recall Salvador Dali and Luis Bunuel’s Un Chien Andalou, and Dziga Vertov’s Man with a Movie Camera.  The match-cut is rendered useless without the proper editing technique.  Nir’s fast-paced sequences connect a mummy and a prop Pharaoh’s coffin suspended between the bare wooden beams of the artist’s studio.  Gallons of sand flood into the mummy’s mouth and the audience watches his struggle to continue breathing.  Nir immediately cuts to the exterior of Pharaoh’s tomb also receiving the sand. The image of the mummy repeats but the Pharaoh’s tomb is turned upside down, forcing the sand out.  The soundtrack meant to strengthen the visual connection between objects also sounds as though as an amateur were left to adjust the levels on the mixing board.